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Educational Therapy Job Outlook in Rhode Island

Prospective educational therapists living in Rhode Island are, understandably, quite concerned about what the job outlook is like for their field. They don't have to be, however, because educational therapy is at least one career area that hasn't been touched by this troubled economy. While people in other professions are getting laid off at every turn, educational therapists are getting hired every day and are enjoying wonderful job security in addition to very lucrative and stable pay. The thing to keep in mind, however, is that not just anyone can suddenly decide to become an educational therapist. It is a job that takes a strong commitment and years of hard work and planning to obtain, but it is well worth it in the end, and those who stick with it will be rewarded.

The best way to ensure that you get a job in the field is to arm yourself with the two things that will make you outshine the rest of the competition: a strong, higher level education, and some real world experience. Both of these things might sound difficult or even impossible to gain, but you can do it if you are committed!

Education is, of course, where you should start. Look at your current educational status and the requirements of the job within the field that you would like to have to determine what level degree is right for you and your situation. While we can't tell you which one that will be, we can provide you with some basic guidelines on the different degree types that are available.

The first and lowest level degree that we will discuss is the associate's degree. All you need to go for this degree is a high school diploma or its equivalent, so it is a very beginner level degree and not for those who have had some formal schooling in the past. Another important thing to note about the associate's degree is that, on its own, it will not be worth much of anything in the field. However, if you use it to transfer earned credits to an accredited bachelor's degree program, you will find that it makes for a fine academic start. The good thing about earning an associate's degree is that it is quick, usually taking only two years or less, and extremely affordable. It can also be a less intimidating way to ease yourself into higher education.

Of course, you can accomplish an educational start all in one go, without fretting over transferring credits. The easiest way to do this is by simply enrolling in an undergraduate program from the start. These programs grant bachelors' degrees, which are typically earned in about four years. You will need this degree for any higher level degree, and it is of some use by itself. With a bachelor's degree, you can qualify for more entry level positions in the field, such as tutor or teacher or educational therapist assistant. If such a career is your ultimate goal, then this is the highest level of education you will have to obtain.

The best way to open yourself up for more and better opportunities, however, is to go for a master's degree. For those who are coming to the field later in life, perhaps after they have already earned an undergraduate degree in another area, don't worry! Most master's level programs are more than happy to accept students from diverse academic backgrounds. They enjoy the unique perspectives that these students bring to the program. Master's degree programs are designed for working adults, so you can work or raise a family while you earn your education. Furthermore, you can complete such a program in as little as one to three years, with a great many classes being offered online or in the evenings.

If you desire, after earning a master's degree, you can also choose to pursue a PhD. This very high level degree requires an intense four to eight years of study, but it will earn you the most prestigious positions in the field and the highest salary you can imagine, so it's definitely something to consider. Just make sure you also get in some real experience by completing an internship or volunteer hours.